photo of a basket of honeysuckle blossoms | Honeysuckle syrup is like a yummy taste of summer! This syrup is super easy to make, with delicious flavor and honey color

How To Make Honeysuckle Syrup

Honeysuckle syrup is like a yummy taste of summer! This syrup is super easy to make, with delicious flavor and honey color. 

Honeysuckle will forever remind me of a southern summer, it’s sweet fragrance lingering on the lazy breeze. Growing up it was always a sure sign summer was on its way, with longer days and fun in the sun. We’d pick the blossoms on the long walk back and forth to our friend’s house down the street from us and suck the sweet nectar. It’s the lilac of summer, but all too soon those cheerful blooms faded.

Photo of a white basket with honeysuckle blossoms. (c) Rosevine Cottage Girls | RosevineCottageGirls.comHoneysuckle syrup is like a yummy taste of summer! This syrup is super easy to make, with delicious flavor and honey color

This year we were inspired by our wild violet syrup and wanted to try our hand at making some yummy honeysuckle recipes before all the blossoms were gone.

Identifying Honeysuckle

There are a lot of different varieties of honeysuckle, the flowers are very similar with a long tubular base changing into fluted petals that open to reveal the stamens and pistil of the flower. Some varieties of honeysuckle flowers are all white, others are white with yellow tips and still, while other’s blossoms are coral, pink or orange.

photo of a woman in a garden picking honeysuckle holding a basket | rosevinecottagegirls.com | (c) Rosevine Cottage Girls, honey suckle syrup, how to make honeysuckle syrup, making honeysuckle syrup from scratch, rosevine cottage girls make honeysuckle syrup, teach how to make honeysuckle syrup

Bush varieties will have brown hollow stems and can get anywhere between a few feet high and wide to 30 feet tall. The leaves will vary between varieties some have smooth, oval leaves and non-serrated edges, others have leaves with pointed tips, and others have hairy undersides. Honeysuckle will also get berries ranging in coloring from red to brown.

Climbing varieties will look a lot like the bush variety in foliage and flowers. It can be found growing up trellises and along fences.

Woman in a hat and holding a basket picking wild honeysuckle along a gravel road | picking honeysuckle, honey suckle syrup, how to make honeysuckle syrup, making honeysuckle syrup from scratch, rosevine cottage girls make honeysuckle syrup, teach how to make honeysuckle syrup (c) Rosevine Cottage Girls | RosevineCottageGirls.com

To Grow Or Not To Grow

Honeysuckle grows naturally where we live, many people cut it down or pull it out before it gets established because it’s really invasive and grows everywhere.

We have two bush varieties that were volunteers in our yard. We trimmed into trees them up into trees so it would be easier to get under them. They are actually very lovely as trees and HUGE, which makes for great privacy from neighbors and the street. They also a wonderful source of shade in our yard. Which is really nice when you live in Tennessee, and summer feels like you have made the sun angry and there is no explaining the humidity. You can walk outside and 2 minutes later your upper lip is sweating and your sunglasses are surfing down your nose.

When And What To Pick Blooms

Expect to see flowers in mid to late spring, pick blossoms that look healthy and not wilted or damaged.

Bottle of honeysuckle syrup on a white background | Honeysuckle syrup is like a yummy taste of summer! This syrup is super easy to make, with delicious flavor and honey color picking honeysuckle, honey suckle syrup, how to make honeysuckle syrup, making honeysuckle syrup from scratch, rosevine cottage girls make honeysuckle syrup, teach how to make honeysuckle syrup | RosevineCottageGirls.com

Honeysuckle Syrup Recipe

Ingredients:

1 cup of fresh honeysuckle flowers
2 cups of water
1 cup of sugar

Directions:

  1. Add water and honeysuckle flowers to a small saucepan. Turn heat to high and bring to a boil. As soon as the water boils, turn the heat down to low or medium-low and allow the mixture to gently simmer until the liquid is reduced by half.
  2. Strain the honeysuckle flowers from the liquid and compost them. Combine the honeysuckle flower water with the sugar and stir until the sugar is completely dissolved. Feel free to place this back on the stove and heat it a bit, if needed.
  3. Pour your honeysuckle syrup into a glass jar. Put a lid on and label the jar. Store it in the refrigerator. This syrup should last up to 6 months with the amount of sugar it contains, but it’s always a good idea to keep an eye out for mold and to use it quickly.
Woman in a floppy hat picking honeysuckle, honey suckle syrup, how to make honeysuckle syrup, making honeysuckle syrup from scratch, rosevine cottage girls make honeysuckle syrup, teach how to make honeysuckle syrup | RosevineCottageGirls.com (c) Rosevine Cottage Girls

What To Use It On

You can use this syrup for a splash of summer flavor on anything you would use normal syrup on. Some of our favorites are:

Other Uses For Honeysuckle

Honeysuckle blossoms can be dried for tea, salves, and soap, made it to jelly or you can use this syrup in bread or desserts.

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