Delicious Bone Broth Recipe and Canning Instructions

Bone broth is a super healthy way to introduce minerals and collagen and other goodies into the body. Sip it in a mug or make it into your favorite soup this delicious broth will do so much for your body. Here is Mr. Cottage’s bone broth recipe. You don’t need a crock pot to make it. We actually refer to make it on the stove to make sure that it cooks super low and you get all of the collagen out of the bones.
 
What you will need:
Wooden Spoon or other long-handled spoons
Vegetable Peeler
Sharp Knife
Measuring Spoons
 

Bone Broth Recipe

2 Tbsp raw apple cider vinegar
Vegetables (if desired)  (I used carrots, garlic, celery, squash, zucchini, onions, and mushroom),
1-gallon bottle of spring water
Himalayan Pink Salt
bones  (You can use chicken, beef, pork brown the pork before making broth with it or even fish bones) A good source of collagen is chicken wings, necks, and chicken feet.
 
Bone Broth | photo of bone broth in a glass bowl with a cutting board with beef bones, beef and carrots sitting near it.

Making your Bone Broth

First Chop your veggies.
Put your bones in the pan. And add the veggies and vinegar.
Pour the water in until full but still giving enough room to boil. Add about a tablespoon of Celtic sea salt. Bring to a boil on the stove then turn down to low. Cook on low all day, then strain all the veggies and bones out, depending on the state of the veggies you can either keep them and make another batch or throw them away with the bones. Store in the fridge or can it. And you are done! Now you can make soup or anything else that you think of or sip it daily.
 

How To Can Bone Broth

Prepare your pressure canner according to the manual that came with it. Check what pressure you need to can for your altitude, you can check that out by heading over to the National Center For Home Food Preservation. Here in middle Tennessee, we can chicken broth at 10 lbs.   Pressure Canning Altitude Chart Make sure you have a rack in your canner, sitting your jars on the bottom of the canner can break them. Heat the broth to boiling and fill your canning jars with the hot broth. Leave a 1-inch headspace in your jars, wipe the rims, and place a lid and ring on the jar. Using a jar lifter place your filled canning jar into the pressure canner. Continue until the canner is full. CHECK THE INSTRUCTIONS FOR YOUR PRESSURE CANNER AND FOLLOW THE MANUFACTURERS INSTRUCTIONS. For our canner: Secure the lid and follow the directions to get your canner to the correct pressure. Process pints for 20 minutes, and quarts for 25 minutes. Once the time is up turn off the heat and remove the pressure canner from your stove. DO NOT OPEN IT. DO NOT REMOVE THE GAUGE OR WEIGHT DO NOT FORCE DOWN THE PRESSURE VALVE Let it sit until the pressure has gone completely down. Cover a counter with several thicknesses of towels. Once there is no more pressure in your canner remove the lid and lift the jars out, place them on the prepared towels and let them cool completely. We like to let ours sit for 24 hours. Once they are cool wipe the jars down and label them. Store them in a dark pantry until you are ready to use them.
 

Print Recipe

Bone Broth

Bone Broth

Ingredients

  • A stock pot
  • 2 Tbsp raw apple cider vinegar
  • Vegetables (if desired)  (I used carrots, garlic, celery, squash, zucchini, onions, and mushroom),
  • 1 gallon bottle of spring water
  • Himalayan Pink Salt
  • bones  (You can use chicken, beef, pork brown the pork before making broth with it or even fish bones) A good source of collagen is chicken wings, necks and chicken feet.

Instructions

First Chop your veggies.
Put your bones in the pan.
And add the veggies and vinegar.
Pour the water in until full but still giving enough room to boil.
Add about a tablespoon of Celtic sea salt.
Bring to a boil on the stove then turn down to low.
Cook on low all day, then strain all the veggies and bones out, depending on the state of the veggies you can either keep them and make another batch or throw them away with the bones.
Store in the fridge or can it.
And you're done!
Now you can make soup or anything else that you think of or sip it daily.

Bone Broth

 
 
More Information on Bone Broth
We are not a doctor or a nurse, but if you would like more information on the healing elements of bone broth check out Dr. Axe’s article.
And our nurse friend over at Deep Roots At Home with her article 8 Age Defying Reasons I Drink Bone Broth
 
Farmhouse Kitchen Cooking

About The Author

Skip to Recipe
Scroll to Top