How to easily make mini gingerbread houses #rosevinecottagegirls

Easy Mini Gingerbread Houses Recipe + Assembly Tutorial

Mini gingerbread houses have been turning heads for the last couple of years, with their adorable size that can fit on the side of your mug and dainty decorations. These little cuties have been on our to-do list since we first saw a picture of them, but we finally decided to jump in and do it. And we weren’t disappointed! Spicy and sweet meet in a delicious display that can sit right on the edge of your mug!

Gingerbread houses are iconic this time of year, you can find the kits in almost every store. But there is truly nothing like the taste of homemade gingerbread! We love to serve these mini gingerbread houses with coffee, hot chocolate, and even tea.

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Coffee mug with a gingerbread cookie house on the rim | How to easily make mini gingerbread houses #rosevinecottagegirls

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Mini Gingerbread Houses

Can You Eat Mini Ginger Bread Houses?

Yes, Gingerbread houses and mini gingerbread houses are edible a8nd taste amazing! They are the perfect holiday treat to share with your family and friends. 

How Long Does Mini Gingerbread Houses Last?

Mini gingerbread houses will last about one month before they become uneatable. Store-bought gingerbread house kits can be stored in your freezer unassembled for about 12 months. 

How Do You Keep Mini Gingerbread Houses Fresh?

If you want to display your mini gingerbread houses, display them in a cool dry place. Cover at night with plastic wrap to keep out moisture, dust, and bugs. If you don’t wish to display them, store them in an air-tight container.

Does Gingerbread Have Ginger?

Yes, mini gingerbread houses do have ginger in them as do regular gingerbread houses. 

What Is The Story Behind Gingerbread Houses

Gingerbread has taken many shapes over the years and has a long history. A very early form of this classic treat can be traced back to ancient Greeks and Egyptians who used it for ceremonial purposes.  Gingerbread then made arrived on the shores of Europe with the 11th-century crusaders who brought back ginger from the middle east, as the price of ginger became more affordable gingerbread really began to catch on. 

An early European recipe for gingerbread consisted of ground almonds, stale breadcrumbs, rosewater, sugar and, ginger. The resulting paste was then pressed into wooden molds. These wooden molds were often carved with the likeness of new kings, emperors, and queens, or religious symbols. The finished cookie might be decorated with edible gold paint or flat white icing to highlight the details in the relief. 

In the 16th Century, the English traded out the breadcrumbs for flour and added eggs and sweeteners which created a much lighter product. The first gingerbread man is credited to Queen Elizabeth 1st who presented visiting dignitaries a gingerbread cookie baked in their likeness. Gingerbread tied with a ribbon became popular at fairs and exchanged as a token of love.  

The gingerbread house became popular in German after the publication of the Brothers Grimm published their fairytale collection which included Hansel & Gretel. Early German settlers brought the tradition of gingerbread houses to American shores. Gingerbread houses never caught on in England as they did in America, but still can be found in places around the world.  

Mini Gingerbread Houses Recipe

 

What You Need To Make Mini Gingerbread Houses:

Mini Gingerbread Houses:

3 cups all-purpose flour

¾ teaspoon baking soda

½ teaspoon ground cinnamon

½ teaspoon ground ginger

¼ teaspoon ground cloves

¼ teaspoon salt

½ cup molasses

½ cup raw sugar

1 large egg

4 tablespoons grass-fed butter, at room temperature

2 tablespoons oil

Icing:

1 egg white

3-4 teaspoons of water

¼ teaspoon cream of tartar

2 cups confectioners’ sugar

Christmas planner free issue
 

Directions:

Whisk all dry ingredients in a medium bowl.

Beat butter, oil, molasses, sugar, and egg in an electric mixer until combined. Add half the flour mixture and beat on medium speed until incorporated. Add the remaining flour mixture and beat until just combined.

Divide the gingerbread dough in half. Place half of the dough on a 12-inch-long sheet of parchment paper dusted with flour; shape the dough into a disk. Add another dusting of flour to the top and follow that with another piece of parchment.

Roll the dough out between the parchment into a circle about ⅛-inch thick. Place the dough in the paper on a baking sheet. Freeze on the baking sheet until cold and firm, at least 30 minutes or up to 24 hours. Repeat with the remaining dough.

Position a rack in the middle of your oven; preheat to 350°F. Line a large baking sheet with parchment paper.

Working with one portion of dough at a time, remove from the freezer and place on a clean work surface. Remove parchment paper from the dough.

Using the mini gingerbread cutter cut the pieces for each house out of the dough (you’ll need two of every piece). Transfer the mini gingerbread house pieces to the prepared baking sheet. Leave about an inch to a half-inch between each piece. If the dough gets to soft place it back in the fridge for several minutes or until firm again. Save the scraps of dough to be formed into another disk and cut for more mini gingerbread houses.

Bake the mini gingerbread houses one pan at a time until the baked pieces are the same color as the uncooked pieces, 6 to 12 minutes depending on your oven. Let the mini gingerbread houses sit for 5 minutes, then transfer yo a wire rack or counter to cool.

In a clean mixing bowl, whip egg white and cream of tartar at high speed until foamy. Add powdered sugar in batches, mixing well. Beat on high until the icing is stiff and glossy (1 to 2 minutes).

Spoon the icing into a pastry bag with a small tip, pipe a bit of icing along the edge of one of the side pieces, and attach to the front and back of the house. Repeat on the other side. Press the pieces firmly together but not so hard they break. Pipe a bit more icing along the skinny sides of one of the roof pieces and attach it to the house. Repeat on the other side of the mini gingerbread house. Set the gingerbread house to the side, and continue until all the houses are built. The houses are finished when the icing has hardened, (about 4 hours).

Decorate the houses however you wish, we chose to go with a simple powdered sugar roof. But you can do whatever you want.

Print This Mini Gingerbread Houses Recipe

Mini Gingerbread Houses Recipe + Assembly Tutorial

Mini Gingerbread Houses Recipe + Assembly Tutorial

Ingredients

  • 3 cups all-purpose flour
  • ¾ teaspoon baking soda
  • ½ teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • ½ teaspoon ground ginger
  • ¼ teaspoon ground cloves
  • ¼ teaspoon salt
  • ½ cup molasses
  • ½ cup of raw sugar
  • 1 large egg
  • 4 tablespoons grass-fed butter (at room temperature)
  • 2 tablespoons avocado oil
  • Icing:
  • 1 egg white
  • 3-4 teaspoons of water
  • ¼ teaspoon cream of tartar
  • 2 cups confectioners' sugar

Instructions

Whisk all dry ingredients in a medium bowl.
Beat butter, oil, molasses, sugar, and egg in an electric mixer until combined. Add half the flour mixture and beat on medium speed until incorporated. Add the remaining flour mixture and beat until just combined.
Divide the gingerbread dough in half. Place half of the dough on a 12-inch-long sheet of parchment paper dusted with flour; shape the dough into a disk. Add another dusting of flour to the top and follow that with another piece of parchment.
Roll the dough out between the parchment into a circle about ⅛-inch thick. Place the dough in the paper on a baking sheet. Freeze on the baking sheet until cold and firm, at least 30 minutes or up to 24 hours. Repeat with the remaining dough.
Position a rack in the middle of your oven; preheat to 350°F. Line a large baking sheet with parchment paper.
Working with one portion of dough at a time, remove from the freezer and place on a clean work surface. Remove parchment paper from the dough.
Using the mini gingerbread cutter cut the pieces for each house out of the dough (you'll need two of every piece). Transfer the mini gingerbread house pieces to the prepared baking sheet. Leave about an inch to a half-inch between each piece. If the dough gets to soft place it back in the fridge for several minutes or until firm again. Save the scraps of dough to be formed into another disk and cut for more mini gingerbread houses.
Bake the mini gingerbread houses one pan at a time until the baked pieces are the same color as the uncooked pieces, 6 to 12 minutes depending on your oven. Let the mini gingerbread houses sit for 5 minutes, then transfer yo a wire rack or counter to cool.
In a clean mixing bowl, whip egg white and cream of tartar at high speed until foamy. Add powdered sugar in batches, mixing well. Beat on high until the icing is stiff and glossy (1 to 2 minutes).
Spoon the icing into a pastry bag with a small tip, pipe a bit of icing along the edge of one of the side pieces, and attach to the front and back of the house. Repeat on the other side. Press the pieces firmly together but not so hard they break. Pipe a bit more icing along the skinny sides of one of the roof pieces and attach it to the house. Repeat on the other side of the mini gingerbread house. Set the gingerbread house to the side, and continue until all the houses are built. The houses are finished when the icing has hardened, (about 4 hours).
Decorate the houses however you wish, we chose to go with a simple powdered sugar roof. But you can do whatever you want.


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